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Communication Studies Associates, Bachelors and Masters Degrees in New Hampshire

The community of communication professionals is vast in the Granite State. According to the New Hampshire Office of Workforce Opportunity, there were 200 broadcast technicians, 1,410 graphic designers, 70 multimedia artists, 850 public relations specialists, and 240 reporters and correspondents employed throughout the state in 2010. Students interested in becoming members of this growing field can take advantage of the many degree options ranging from graphic design and media studies to communication technology and integrated marketing offered by local colleges and universities.

Undergraduate Degrees in Communications – Choosing to earn an associate’s or bachelor’s degree with a major in communications will give you the qualifications you need to start a career in mass media and digital communications. Whether you’re interested in journalism and independent filmmaking, or marketing and public relations, the know-how needed to reach people with a targeted message starts with a degree in communications.

Master’s Degrees in Communications – No matter your professional background or undergraduate major, you could earn a master’s in communications to prepare for a career in any number of diverse areas that include journalism, public relations, marketing, digital media and more.

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Featured Program:
Communications@Syracuse is the online Master of Science in Communications from the world-renowned S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University. This program offers students a foundation in communications, digital media, social media and digital journalism.

Book Publishing

New Hampshire first made book history in 1833, when it opened the Peterborough Town Library, the now oldest free public library supported by taxation in the United States and the world at large. Today, the process of book publishing involves a cooperative team of graphic designers, authors, editors, printers, marketers, distributers, buyers, literary agents, writers, and other communication experts. Publishing majors can find industry mentors, internships, volunteer positions, and career inspiration through local publishers such as Hobblebush Books, Plaidswede Distinctive Publishing, Chase Publishing, Donald M. Grant Publisher, Whitehorse Press, Cobblestone Publishing, and Moose Country Press.

Independent Booksellers

  • Toadstool Bookshop
  • Village Book Store
  • Innisfree Bookshop
  • Annie’s Book Stop
  • Sheafe Street Books
  • Bayswater Book Company

Resources for Publishing majors

New England Independent Booksellers Association

Association of American Publishers

Journalism

Students that pursue a journalism education and career in New Hampshire will be following in the footsteps of such local industry legends as Thomas Bailey Aldrich, Charles Dana, Horace Greenly, and Sarah Josepha Hale. Journalism majors can also make historical contributions by working for highly circulated newspapers like the New Hampshire Union Leader, Carriage Towne News, and Weirs Times. Of course, news analysts, correspondents, and reporters at the Bedford Journal, Merrimack Journal, and the Peterborough Transcript can also be rising stars in their own right.

Collegiate Newspapers

  • The New Hampshire
  • The Clock
  • The Equinox
  • The Dartmouth
  • The Piece Arrow

Resource for Journalism majors

New Hampshire Press Association

TV and Radio Broadcasting

Young broadcasters driven by dreams of working with national television broadcasting titans ABC, NBS, and PBS gravitate toward affiliate stations WMUR-TV Channel 9 in Manchester, WNNE-TV Channel 31 in West Central, and WENH-TV Channel 11 in Durham. In the greater Manchester area, independent station WBIN-TV Channel 50 is the sole locally owned and operated TV station while regional network Valley TV Channel 30 brings White Mountain culture to resident viewers.

Due to New Hampshire’s modest geographical size, TV and radio audiences often receive broadcasting amenities from its neighboring states of Vermont, Massachusetts, and Maine. Yet student-operated stations like WPCR FM 91.7, WSCS FM 90.9, WKNH FM 91.3, and WUNH FM 91.3 continue to buzz with news, weather, sports, area events, music, and entertainment for local campus communities. With a modern eye for diversity, New Hampshire’s broadcasters electrify airways with hoards of unique radio stations such as WXXK FM 100.5, WMOU AM 1230, WOQL FM 98.7, WEMJ AM 1490, and WSHK FM 105.3.

Local Broadcasting Providers

  • Devon Broadcasting
  • New Hampshire Public Broadcasting
  • Tone Multimedia
  • Carlisle One Media
  • Hearst-Argyle Television

Resource for Broadcasting majors

New Hampshire Association of Broadcasters

Public Relations and Marketing

In this competitive consumer market, businesses that create goods and services for the public are forever attempting to attract and compel buyers to invest in their products. To create lasting and profitable relationships with New Hampshire clientele, local companies like Monolith Software, Proton Media, Sutherland Global, Top Drawer Boutique, and Merrill Lynch seek solace in the media guidance of LTD Company, Inc., Trident Communications Group, and Millennium Integrated Marketing.

Public Relations and Marketing Firms

  • Jibe Communications
  • StoreyManseau, LLC
  • Makibie Corporation
  • Howling Beagle Communications
  • Louis Karno & Company
  • BridgeView Marketing and Communications

Resources for Public Relations and Marketing majors

New England Marketing Research Association

Public Relations Society of America